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2 Deer
2 Deer
 
 
2
2 Men
2 Men
 
 
3
4 Images
4 Images
 
 
4
Airplane
Airplane
 
 
5
Ben Turpin and Ship
Ben Turpin and Ship
Ben Turpin (September 19, 1869 – July 1, 1940) was a cross-eyed American comedian and actor, best remembered for his work in silent films (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ben_Turpin) 
 
6
Bridge by a house
Bridge by a house
 
 
7
Camera man
Camera man
 
 
8
Cartoon character water reflection
Cartoon character water reflection
 
 
9
Cat
Cat
 
 
10
Cockatoo
Cockatoo
 
 
11
Cows
Cows
 
 
12
Dog peers over the garden fence
Dog peers over the garden fence
 
 
13
Elf
Elf
 
 
14
Fish
Fish
 
 
15
Fisherman
Fisherman
 
 
16
Giraffe
Giraffe
 
 
17
Hamlet with lengthening shadows
Hamlet with lengthening shadows
 
 
18
Harbour scene
Harbour scene
 
 
19
Henry VIII
Henry VIII
 
 
20
Horse
Horse
 
 
21
Hunch back
Hunch back
 
 
22
John Bull
John Bull
 
 
23
Lady
Lady
 
 
24
Lion and dog
Lion and dog
 
 
25
Old cottage
Old cottage
 
 
26
Old farmstead
Old farmstead
 
 
27
Old text manuscript
Old text manuscript
 
 
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Old text practice sheet
Old text practice sheet
 
 
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Polar bear
Polar bear
The Cubitt was manufactured by the Cubitt Engineering Co Ltd a sister company to Holland, Hannen & Cubitt Ltd the builders of Covent Garden Market, the Cenotaph and the new east wing of Buckingham Palace. Although the production target was 5,000 cars per annum and the Bicester Road factory operated from 1919 to 1925 only 3,000 were ever produced. As you would expect on the whole complete cars were sold however it was also possible to buy a chassis and have a body fitted by a different company.(http://www.chilternhillsrally.org.uk/cubitt.html)

Crossley Motors was a British motor vehicle manufacturer based in Manchester, England. They produced approximately 19,000 high quality cars from 1904 until 1938, 5,500 buses from 1926 until 1958 and 21,000 goods and military vehicles from 1914 to 1945. (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Crossley_Motors)

The Calthorpe Motor Company based in Bordesley Green, Birmingham, England made a range of cars, motorcycles and bicycles from 1904 to 1932 (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Calthorpe_cars)

Calcott was a small English motor vehicle manufacturer from Coventry in Warwickshire. The company began as a bicycle manufacturer in 1886 taking advantage of a boom in the cycling industry at that time. The end of the century brought an end to the cycling boom and the demise of many bicycle manufacturers however Calcott managed to continue production and by 1904 was also building motorcycles. Production switched to automobiles in 1913 of which around 2,500 were made. By the early twenties Calcott was producing 55 cars a week however this was not enough to generate the funds needed for expansion, restricting their automobile manufacturing to a space designed to accommodate bicycle construction. Following the death of chairman James Calcott in 1924 and large financial losses in 1925 it was acquired by the Singer automobile company in 1926 (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Calcott_Brothers) 
 
30
Rhino
Rhino
 
 
31
Rotherham Main Colliery - Canklow - 1890 to 1954
Rotherham Main Colliery - Canklow - 1890 to 1954
A few notes about the locality and why our 'Roebuck' family was there.

Just outside Rotherham, was the then village of Canklow, which had two facilities: an earlier corn mill and the Rotherham Main Colliery (coal mine), pictured left. The colliery was sunk (created) between 1890 and 1893. The owners, John Brown & Co of Sheffield, established a school which catered for 145 pupils from the pit cottages also built nearby. If you look at our family line, George Thomas I was a coal miner during his early career and so was his father Obadiah and his maternal grandfather Francis Moore had been a tin miner in Wales, and had migrated here a couple of decades before.

The mine employed 2000 people in its heyday before the First World War. This site was apparently a bad choice for mining, as it was liable to flooding. In 1891 there was an accident where eight men fell off a wooden platform down the shaft, and only two survived, and were awarded the Albert Medal for their heroic efforts. Eventually the coal became harder to mine, and the colliery declined during the 1930s and 1940s to about 300 men, and it closed in 1954.

So this is the background into which our younger Yorkshire family members were born, where miners lived in rented pit cottages, were employed casually by the day, and sometimes had to move around to different collieries to find work. (Source: Janette [Clare]Walker - 2004) 
 
32
Ruin in the trees
Ruin in the trees
 
 
33
Rural cottage
Rural cottage
 
 
34
Skyline silhouette
Skyline silhouette
 
 
35
St. Peter's Church - Chorley 1851
St. Peter's Church - Chorley 1851
Published on Wednesday 27 April 2011 08:05

In these times when few people have time for religion in their busy lives, it comes as welcome news that one of our local churches is thriving and celebrating a very special anniversary this year.

St Peter's Church, on Harper's Lane, Chorley, is planning a weekend of events to mark its 160th anniversary this month.

Back in the early part of the 19th century the population on the outskirts of Chorley was expanding rapidly.

There had been a Sunday School held in Botany Bay for some time, but as the numbers attending services continued to increase, the lack of a suitable church building became a real problem.

The Rector of Chorley, Rev James Streynsham Master MA and Rev M Sewell (later to become the first Vicar of St Peter's) were encouraged to consider the prospect of building a new church.

The land where the church was to be sited was donated by Lady Susannah Hoghton of Astley Hall, who also donated the stone for the church from her quarry at 'The Nab'.

The services of Mr Charles Reed of Liverpool were enlisted to design the building. Mr Reed was already known in the area for his work at Shaw Hill and the market at Lytham.

His design was in the early English style, with seating for 450 people.

The plans showed the church to have a nave, clerestory, two aisles, a chancel, north porch, vestry and a belfry turret at the west end of the north aisle.

In Charles Reed's own words, he explained "The general effect is expected to be quaint and beautiful, while its elevated situation will make it a landmark from every side."

The stone from the quarry was transported to the site by local farmers who charged nothing for their efforts and the final cost of the building was £2131-17s-10d!

The foundation stone was laid on 5th September 1849 and the project finished 18 months later.

The new church was formally consecrated on St Mark's Day, April 25, 1851.

The ceremony began at 11.30am when the Right Rev James Prince Lee, the first Bishop of Manchester, was met at the door of the church by the Rector.

There was a procession around the church and graveyard before they entered the building for the formal proceedings.

The Rector's wife presented some of the altar silver to the church which is still in use today, along with a silver gilt home communion set presented by Lady Hoghton.

To celebrate St Peter's 150th Anniversary in 2001 a new organ was built for the church by David Wood of Huddersfield.

Copyright notice: Reproduced courtesy of the Chorley Guardian and Johnston Press (websites http://www.chorley-guardian.co.uk and http://www.johnstonpress.co.uk). The material may not be copied or reproduced in any way. 
 
36
That's that
That's that
 
 
37
The 19th century heroine Grace Darling
The 19th century heroine Grace Darling
 
 
38
The bridge o'er the stream
The bridge o'er the stream
 
 
39
The mooring
The mooring
 
 
40
Tiger and leopard
Tiger and leopard
 
 
41
Woodland smallholding
Woodland smallholding